New Testament Manuscripts

Numbers 1501-2000

Note: In the catalog which follows, bold type indicates a fullentry. Plain type indicates a short entry, which may occur under anothermanuscript.

Contents:

Manuscript 1505

Location/Catalog Number

Mount Athos, where it has been as long as it has been known. Catalognumber: Athos Laura B' 26

Contents

1505 contains the entire New Testament except the Apocalypse; also Psalmsand Odes. It is written on parchment, 1 column per page.

Date/Scribe

The colophon (which is not in the same hand as the manuscript) claimsa date of 1084. E.C. Colwell has shown that the colophon (the text of whichis shown below) is fraudulent.

(For further discussion of this forged colophon, see the appropriate itemin the article on Scribes and Colophons).

The manuscript probably dates from the twelfth century. Gary S. Dykes reportsthat it is by the same scribe as 2400, which the Alands date to the thirteenthcentury but which Dykes believes to come from the twelfth century.

Description and Text-type

1505 is most closely associated with 2495 (XV, at Sinai). 2495 couldperhaps be a slightly corrupted descendent of 1505; certainly they havea close common ancestor.

In the gospels, von Soden listed 1505 as Kx. Wisse describesit as Kmix/Kmix/Kx, and adds "KxCluster 261 in 1 and 10; pair with 2495."

In the Acts and Epistles, 1505 is a member of family 2138 (also knownas family 614 or family 1611). It is one of the leading members of thegroup, especially in Paul, where the family consists of only a handfulof manuscripts (1505, 1611, 2495, the Harklean Syriac, 1022 in part, andprobably 2005). In the Acts and Catholics, where the family breaks downinto several subgroups, 1505 and 2495 form their own subgroup (other importantsubgroups include 2138+1611, 2412+614, and -- in the Catholics --630+1799+429+522+206. For further details, see the entry on2138.)

Family 2138 is often described as "Western." This is perhapsopen to question; its kinship with D is, at the very least, loose. Thefamily contains a significant number of non-Byzantine non-Alexandrian readings,but these appear to me to come from their own independent tradition.

Aland and Aland classify 1505 as CategoryV in the Gospels and CategoryIII in the Acts and Epistles.

See also the entry on 2495.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

von Soden: δ165

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:
Kirsopp & Silva Lake, Dated Greek Minuscule Manuscripts to theYear 1200 A.D.

Editions which cite:
Cited in NA26 for the Catholic Epistles.
Cited in NA27 for Acts, Paul, and Catholics.
Cited in NA28 for Acts and Paul but no longer included in the apparatus for the Catholics
Cited in UBS4 for the Gospels and Catholics.

Other Works:
E.C. Colwell, "Methods in Validating Byzantine Date-Colophons:A Study of Athos, Laura B.26," originally published as "A MisdatedNew Testament Manuscript: Athos, Laura B.26 (146) in Quntulacumque:Stodies Presented to Kirsopp Lake...; republished in Colwell, Studiesin Methodology in Textual Criticism of the New Testament, pp. 142-147
See also the various articles by C.-B. Amphoux concerning Family 2138.


Manuscript 1506

Location/Catalog Number

Mount Athos, where it has been as long as it has been known. Catalognumber: Athos Laura B' 89.

Contents

Contains the gospels with very many minor lacunae. Also contains Romansplus 1 Corinthians 1:1-2, 1:4-4:15, again with minor lacunae. Written onparchment, 1 column per page. Commentary manuscript; Maurice Robinson(confirming Von Soden) notes that it has a "Theophylact interspersedcommentary."

Date/Scribe

The colophon gives a date of 1320. The text is written in red ink,with the commentary in black; the latter is much easier to read. Maurice Robinson,who has examined films of the manuscript, makes this observation: "Theoph. Comm.interspersed with text; but the red ink used for the text is so light [on the film]as to be virtually non-readable. Only major readings can be noted, and not orthographicor individual letters in most cases."

Description and Text-type

In the gospels 1506 is Byzantine. It was not profiled by Wisse due toan illegible microfilm. (No doubt the poor condition of the manuscriptis largely responsible for this; in addition, Wisse generally did notexamine commentary manuscripts.) Nonetheless, it does not appear to belongto the major Byzantine strands (Kx, Kr, etc.), asit omits the story of the Adulteress.

In Paul, insofar as it survives, 1506 is extraordinarily valuable. Theoverall cast of its text is Alexandrian, falling close to ℵ. But italso has at least one unique reading: Alone among known Greek manuscripts,it omits chapter 16 of Romans. (It place the doxology of Romansafter both chapter 14 and chapter 15.) Many scholars have, of course, questionedwhether chapter 16 belongs here; the finding of a Greek manuscript whichomits the chapter is, at the very least, interesting.

Aland and Aland classify 1506 as Category V in the Gospels andCategory II in Paul.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

von Soden: Θε402

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:

Editions which cite:
Cited in NA26-NA28 for Paul (although, giventhe state of the manuscript, its readings can only be considered assuredwhen it is cited explicitly).
Cited in SQE13 for the Gospels.
Cited in UBS4 for Paul.

Other Works:


Manuscript 1611

Athens, National Library 64.Von Soden's α208;Tischendorf 307a, 351p, 105r;Scrivener 307a, 469p, 111r.Contains the Acts, Pauline and Catholic Epistles, and Apocalypsewith lacunae. Considered by von Soden to belong with Ic1 in the Actsand Epistles and to go with Αν (Andreas) in the Apocalypse.Dated to the tenth century by Scrivener/Miller, to the twelfth byvon Soden and Kurzgefasste Liste, and to the tenth byNA28.Its text has long been known to be interesting;von Soden's classification as Ic1 places it in2138 and Family 2138(also known as Family 1611) in the Acts and Epistles, and everystudy since his time has confirmed that; Wachtel put it inHkgr, Richards listed it as Group A1 inthe Johannine Epistles (a group he called Alexandrian but whichis in fact Family 2138), Amphoux put it in the 2138/1611 type in theCatholics, and Barbara Aland cited it as one of her Greekwitnesses paralleling the Harklean Syriac in the CatholicEpistles. The Alands list it as Category IIIin the Acts, Paul, and the Catholics (this is typical of Family 2138 witnesses),and as Category II in the Apocalypse.Despite their high rating in the Apocalypse, its main importance isprobably in the Acts and Catholic Epistles; for details, see theentry on 2138 and Family 2138.


Manuscript 1739

Location/Catalog Number

Mount Athos, where it has been as long as it has been known. Catalognumber: Athos Laura B' 64

Contents

1739 contains the Acts, Paul, and the Catholic Epistles. Acts 1:1-2:6are from another, later hand. The quire numbers indicate that the volumeoriginally contained the Gospels as well. (One may speculate that Acts1:1-2:6 were removed when the Gospels and Acts were separated.) It mayhave also contained the Apocalyse; we simply cannot tell at this time (thelast page of the manuscript shows signs of offprints of a kephalia listfor the Apocalypse, but these do not appear to come from the same scribe).There are a number of marginal comments from early church fathers; in Paulthe majority of these are from Origen, though in the Acts and CatholicEpistles other writers come to the fore.

At some point several of the pages had portions cut off; this evidently costus the colophon for Acts and part of that for Paul. Several of the marginalnotes also seem to have suffered attempts at erasure. It has been speculatedthat these were removed by an owner of the manuscript who disapproved oftheir contents (perhaps he didn't approve of the editor of the commentary?And the editor probably gave his name, as there are comments in the firstperson).

1739 is written on parchment, 1 column per page.

Date/Scribe

Dated paleographically to the tenth century.

The scribe, who gives his name as Ephraim, also wrote the Venice Aristotle(Codex Marcianus 201), dated by its colophon to 954. Ephraim is also believedto have written the gospel codex 1582, dated 949, and our chief manuscriptof Polybius (believed to date from 947).

In his work on 1739, Ephraim copied a preface to the Pauline Epistles which apparently camefrom the compiler of this commentary edition. It states that thatedition was based on a very ancient manuscript which was found to havea text similar to Origen's. The exception is Romans, which was taken directlyfrom the text of Origen's commentary on that book.

It has been thought thatEphraim compiled the commentary itself, but it seems more likely thathe had it before him and copied it.

One or two later hands have worked on the codex, probably during the twelfth andthirteenth centuries. One added lectionary notes. The same or (more likely)another added comments that Lake called "long but unimportant."Also around this time, a reader attempted to eradicate many of the ancient notes.It is possible that this is also the person who cut off the final colophon.Whoever this person was, he has significantly reduced our knowledge of thismost valuable of codices.

Description and Text-type

The earlier editors classified 1739 as Alexandrian. Von Soden describesit as a member of the H group in Paul; in Acts he placed it with Ib2.

Zuntz, based on a far more detailed examination of 1 Corinthiansand Hebrews (only), placed it in its owntext-type with P46, B, and the Coptic versions.

The Lakes considered it a strong representative of the "Cæsarean"text.

Richards places it in his "Group A3," which I wouldcall "family 1739," in the Johannine Epistles. The work of Duplacyand Amphoux confirms the existence of this group in the Catholics as awhole. (Wachtel, however, who examines manuscripts based on relativelyfew readings, does not distinguish the "Alexandrian" and family1739 texts.)

Thomas C. Geer, who examined Family 1739 in Acts, concluded that the manuscriptwas Egyptian, but also belonged to Family 1739. (For this rathercontradictory statement, see the section on family 1739below.)

The similarity to the text of Origen, first noted by the compiler ofthe ancestor, is real, although 1739's text is by no means identical toOrigen's. It should be noted, however, that there is no evident changein text-type between Romans and Paul's other letters.

In the author's opinion, family 1739 forms its own text-type, which(in Paul in particular) falls between the other three non-Byzantine text-types (P46/B,Alexandrian, "Western"). Also in the author's opinion, the readingsof this group are extremely early and deserve consideration equal to thatgiven to the best uncials.

1739 is the best and usually the earliest representative of a largetextual grouping. In the Acts (where the family is perhaps slightly poorerthan in the Epistles), other members of this group include323, 630,945,and 1891. In Paul, they include 0121(a),0243/0121b,6, 424**,630 (in part),and 1881 (1908 has anabbreviated form of the commentary in Romans, but the text is different). In the Catholics,1739's allies include 323,945,1881, 2298,and (at a slightly greater distance) C/04 and1241. Zuntz believesthat the other Pauline manuscripts (0243, etc.) are descendents of 1739. In my opinion, however,the type goes back before 1739, as most of the lesser manuscripts (with theexception of 0121) preserve at least occasional non-Byzantine readings not found in1739 itself.

Scholars have speculated that 1739 was copied from a fourth or fifthcentury commentary manuscript (since none of the marginal commentatorsquoted date from after the fourth century, and it appears that the scholiawere already present in Ephraim's exemplar). Zuntz, in fact, believes thatthe text of this manuscript was contemporary with P46 (second century).Against this we should point out the flowering of family 1739 texts inthe tenth century -- there are three (1739, 0121, 0243) from thatcentury, and only C (which is a marginal member of the type) occurs earlier.(See, however, the comments by Zuntz on 0121/M). The nature of the text alsomay argue against this; it seems to me likely (though far from certain) that thecombined edition of text and commentary was compiledduring the Photian revival of learning of the ninth century. The text itself,of course, is very much older.

1739 was copied from an uncial ancestor. It is possible that this manuscriptwas also the exemplar of 0243; the two are that close. It seems more likely,however, that 0243 and 1739 are "first cousins," each copiedfrom the same exemplar with one intervening copy. (The marginal commentaryin 1739 may have been added to the intervening copy, or more likely thecopyist of 0243 or its parent did not bother with the marginalia.) Theother members of the family go back somewhat further, and form their ownsubgroups (e.g. 6 and 424** seem to descend from a common text).

Aland and Aland classify 1739 as CategoryII in Acts and Category I in Paul and the Catholics.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

von Soden: α78

Bibliography

Collations:
Kirsopp Lake & Silva New, Six Collations of New Testament Manuscripts.(1932) Collated by Morton S. Enslin from photographs by R.P. Blake. Thetext and annotations are collated separately. A few passages are omittedbecause of damaged photographs.

Sample Plates:
Lake & New (1 page)
Aland & Aland (1 page)
Metzger, Manuscripts of the Greek Bible (1 page)

Editions which cite:
Cited in full in NA26, NA27, and all UBS editions.Also cited by von Soden, Merk, and Bover, but these collations are highlyinaccurate.

Other Works:
J.N. Birdsall, A Study of MS. 1739 and its Relationship to MSS.6, 424, 1908, and M (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, 1959)
E. von der Goltz, Eine Textkritische des zehnten bezw. sechsten Jahrhunderts.(1899; includes much of the text, but collated under bad conditions andrather inaccurate. The marginalia are not included.)
Otto Bauernfiend, Der Römerbrieftext des Origens (Texte undUntersuchungen, xiv.3, 1923; includes a discussion of 1739 and its relatives,supplementing von der Goltz)
Thomas C. Geer, Jr., Family 1739 in Acts (Society of BiblicalLiterature Monograph Series, 1994). Consists mostly of tables comparingmanuscripts 206, 322, 323, 429, 453, 522, 630, 945, 1704, 1739, 1891, 2200.The analysis is flawed, but the results are generally valid.
K.W. Kim, "Codices 1582, 1739, and Origen," Journal of BiblicalLiterature, volume 69 (1950), p. 167f.
G. Zuntz, The Text of the Epistles: A Disquisition upon the Corpus Paulinum(1953; includes a large section on 1739, its ancestry, and its relationshipto P46 and B, as well as observations about its relation to Origen).

Note: The above list is very incomplete, and includes only works devoted largelyor entirely to 1739.


The final lines of the final page (folio 102) of 1739. The last four linesof Philemon are shown (verses 22-25, beginning μοι ξενιαν).
This is followed by the subscription,(προς as a ligature) ΦΙΛΗΜΟΝΑ ΕΓΡΑΦΗ ΑΠΟ ΡΩΜΗΣ ΔΙΑ ΤΥΧΙΚΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΟΝΗΣΙΜΟΥ.
This is followed by Ephraim'ssignature. Note that the bottom of this page has been cut off rather sloppily
bya later owner. This presumably was to suppress some information the owner did notapprove of.


Family 1739

Note: This section is far from finished. It may be a long time beforeI get to return to the research, though.

The existence of a "1739-text" was realized almost from thetime when 1739 was discovered, when it was observed that, in Paul, the textof 1739 had similarities to those of M/0121,6,and 424**, and that the marginalcommentary was shared in part by 1908.

At the time, however, little attention was paid to this fact. As recentlyas 1953, Zuntz could write "At any rate, [the] common peculiarities[of 6, 424**, 1908, and 0121] are so striking as to rob these formerlyimportant witnesses of their vote wherever their evidence is now foundto be anticipated by 1739" (G. Zuntz, The Text of the Epistles,1953, p. 74). However, this view needs to be modified in light of moderndiscoveries. The 1739 text is not a simple group, but an actual type, whichin the Catholics can be discerned as early as the fifth century in C (andis in fact even older, as Origen also attests the type). Inany case, all witnesses to the family need to be considered to determineits scope.

The first steps toward this came when Birdsall (in the 1959 thesis notedabove) observed that 0121 was actually two codices, oneof which proved to be part of 0243, which was discovered at about thistime. I myself took a second step by adding to the family 1881, which is(after 1739 itself) the best witness to the complete family in Paul. Inaddition, the pair 630-2200 are weak members of the family in Romans-Galatians.

The family has also gathered some attention in the Catholics. Both Richardsand Amphoux demonstrated its existence. Richards found the family to include(P74) 1739 323 1241 1243 623 5 (1845) (642) in the Johannine Epistles;the more exact research of Amphoux and Outtier located the family textin 323 945 1241 1243 1735 2298 2492.

In Acts, the most detailed study has been that of Thomas C. Geer, Jr., inthe monograph Family 1739 in Acts (Society of Biblical LiteratureMonograph Series, 1994). This work examines an even dozen members of family1739 (206, 322, 323, 429, 453, 522, 630, 945, 1704, 1739, 1891, 2200).Methodologically it is hardly a success; apart from the fact that it usestoo few readings to be of much use, and assumes that the only possibletext-types are Aexandrian, Byzantine, and "Western," it triesto have things both ways by classifying eight manuscripts as Byzantine(206, 322, 323, 429, 522, 630, 1704, 2200) and four as Egyptian(453, 945, 1739, 1891) -- but still calling them all membersof family 1739! In fact all of these manuscripts (except perhaps453) are family 1739 texts with some Byzantine mixture,with the mixture being least in 1739 1891 and most in 322 323.

Even so, Geer's results (when compared with our results from theCatholics) allow us to prepare a sort of a genealogy (though not aprecise stemma) of family 1739. Note the existence of several subgroups,including family 630(630 2200 and some lesser members), which carriesacross the Paulines and Catholics although it does not always alignwith 1739. In the diagram below, the numbers, of course, representactual manuscripts. The bold letters represent hypothetical ancestors.Note that, since this is not a stemma, the lines do not represent actualacts of copying but lines of descent. They may represent onlyone generation of copying, but more likely they represent two or threeor even more. Where there is Byzantine mixture, I have marked this witha light-coloured slash. The extent of the mixture is shown by the numberof slashes.

Partial genealogy of family 1739 in Acts.

The geographical center of Family 1739 is difficult to determine. 1739itself, of course, is on Mount Athos, as are its mixed relative 945 1704. 1241(the best representative in the Catholics other than 1739), 1243 (also goodin the Catholics) and 1881 (the best representatives of the type other than 1739in Paul), however, are at Sinai, and 1891 (the best representative other than 1739in Acts) is at Jerusalem.

All of the above has been based on published results; very little of it ismy own work. The available publications are not always the mostcomplete. The section which follows will attempt to outline the text-typeof family 1739 in Paul and the Catholics, and then describe its significance.

Paul

As noted, the witnesses here are 0121, 0243, 6, 424**, 630/2200 (Romans-Galatians),1881, and 1908.

The first and last of these are most easily disposed of. In both cases,the dependency is obvious.

If we examine the Nestle apparatus, we find that 0121 and 1739 bothexist for 59 readings (disregarding conjectures, punctuation varia, etc.).The two agree in 47 of these cases, or 80% of the time. However, the agreementis actually closer than this. It appears distinctly possible that 0121is a corrupt descendent of 1739. Let us examine the twelve differencesbriefly:

Thus in the fragment in 1 Corinthians 0121 agrees everywhere with 1739(text or margin); in 2 Corinthians it either agrees with 1739 or the Byzantinetext (there appears to have been block mixture here). While 0121 cannothave been copied directly from 1739, it could be a grandchild or niecevia a sister which has suffered Byzantine mixture. In any case it addslittle to the family text.

The same can be said for 1908, which we can briefly dismiss. It sharescertain of 1739's marginal comments (e.g. in Romans 1:7 they share thescholion stating that Origen's text omitted ΕΝ ΡΩΜΗ), but thereis no kinship between the texts. In addition, the marginal commentary in1739 is fuller and better. 1908's commentary may or may not be descendedfrom 1739's; in any case, it offers us nothing of value not found in 1739.

This is simply not true for the other witnesses (0243, 6, 424**, 630,1881). All of them -- especially the first and the last -- can help usto move back beyond 1739. 0243 is helpful because it almost certainly derivesfrom an exemplar no more than three copies removed from 1739's exemplar.1881 is helpful because, although neither as pure nor as good as 1739,it is a complete text of the 1739 type which is independent of 1739 itself.

424** (Tischendorf's 67**) isa manuscript whose ordinary text is quiteByzantine. A corrector worked over that manuscript and made many hundreds ofcorrections, many of them quite striking (e.g. the omission of "inEphesus" in Ephesians 1:1). The vast majority of these changes agreewith 1739.

Given the Byzantine nature of its underlying text, 424 as corrected is notan overwhelmingly good Family 1739 witness. But the corrections themselveswitness an excellent family 1739 text.

Relatively close to 424** is 6(e.g. it too omits "in Ephesus" in Ephesians 1:1). 6 is an odd mix,with late Byzantine scattered among important Family1739 readings (e.g. the omission of "and clings to his wife"in Eph. 5:31 -- a reading shared only with 1739*).

630 (and its close relative2200, which together form family 630 -- a group found throughout Acts, Paul, and the Catholics, though itstext-type changes) is a block-mixed witness. InRomans-Galatians it has a family 1739 text with a significant Byzantineoverlay; from Ephesians on it is nearly purely Byzantine.

1881 is, after 1739, the best complete witness to family 1739. Ithas suffered some Byzantine mixture (it would appear that about 30% ofits distinctive family 1739 readings have been replaced by Byzantinevariants), but still agrees with 1739 some 80% of the time -- as wellas retaining a few family readings where 1739 seems to have sufferedcorruption.

Finally, there is 0243(including the manuscript once known as 0121b).This manuscript, which includes 2 Corinthians complete as well as fragmentsof 1 Corinthians and Hebrews, is noteworthy for its close agreement with1739. The two agree at about 95% of all points of variation. (A strikingexample is their reading χωρις θεου in Heb. 2:9).It is likely that 1739 and 0243 are first cousins; they may evenbe sisters. If we examine Hebrews, for instance, the complete list ofdifferences is as follows:

Verse1739 reads0243 reads
Heb. 1:2 τους αιωνας εποιησεν 1739* with K L Byz εποισε τους αιωνας with Bc (P46 ℵ B* D* I 33 1739c? εποισεν)
Heb. 1:3 εκαθισεν εν with rell εκαθισεν (hapl?)
Heb. 1:4 αυτους with rell αυτοις
Heb. 1:12 αυτους ως ιματιον with P46 ℵ A B D* αυτους with K L 056 0142 33 1881 Byz
Heb. 2:9 1739margin illegible (rell reads χαριτι θεου) χωρις θεου with 1739* 424c
Heb. 4:1 δοκη with P46 ℵ A B D K al δοκει with L 056 0142 al (itac?)
Heb. 12:21 εμφοβος ενφπβος (rell read εκφοβος)
Heb. 12:25 χρηματισαντα τον χρηματισαντα with P46* ℵ* A D (rell χρηματισοντα)
Heb. 13:4 δε 1739c with C Dc K L 33 Byz γαρ 0243 1738* with P46 ℵ* A D* P 81 1175 1881
Heb. 13:5 αρκουμενοι 1739c with rell αρκουμενος 0243 1739* with P46c-vid 81 1881
Heb. 13:6 ου with ℵ* C* P 33 1175 και ου with P46 A D K L 81 1881 Byz
Heb. 13:11 εισφερεται with rell εισφερετε with D* (itac.?)
Heb. 13:16 ευαρεστειται with P46 (ℵ A) D(*) K L rell ευεργετειται 0243vid
Heb. 13:17 υμων και with rell υμων και και (dittog?)
Heb. 13:21 αυτου αυτω 1739margin with ℵ* A C* 33* 81* 1175 αυτου 0243 1739* with D K L 1881 Byz

Thus we find a grand total of only fifteen differences between 1739 and 0243 in Hebrews,many of which do not qualify as "real" variants. Four (1:3, 1:4, 13:16, 13:17)are singular readings of 0243 (two being clear errors and the other two also possiblyslips of the pen). 13:11 is a subsingular itacism in 0243, and the difference in 4:1 isalso itastic. Five (1:2, 2:9, 13:4, 13:5, 13:21) involve places where 1739* and1739margin disagree, with 1739* agreeing with 0243 in four of five cases.12:21 is a spelling variant. Thus, in the whole of Hebrews, 0243 and 1739 have only threesubstantial differences (1:12, 12:25, 13:6, and even 12:25 and 13:6 may be errors of copying).

From such a small sample, it is difficult to determine which of the two manuscriptsis the earlier. If anything, 1739 (even though a minuscule) looks more primitive than 0243.The errors in 0243 imply that it cannot be the exemplar of 1739. But 1739 can hardly be0243's exemplar, either, because of 0243's lack of acknowledgement of the marginalreadings (most of which were included by the original scribe of 1739). The two might besisters, or even more likely, uncle and nephew or first cousins. They probablyaren't much more distant than that.

The following tables summarize the members of Family 1739 in Acts, Paul,and the Catholic Epistles.

Family 1739 in Acts (based on the list offered by Thomas C. Geer, Jr.Family 1739 in Acts). (Note: Von Soden lists as related Ib witnesses thefollowing: 1891 242 522 206 1758 1831 429 536 491 | 1739 2298 323 440 216 066.However, some of these cannot be verified, others are clearly not members ofFamily 1739 in Acts, and in any case the subgroups are wrong. Therefore only witnesses identified by Geer are included.)

MSDateLocationCatalog NumberSoden
descrip.
Comment
206XIIILondonLambeth 1182Ib1 Contains the Acts and Epistles with lacunae. Acts 1:1-12:3, 13:5-15, 2 John, 3 John, and Jude are from another hand (dated XIV). 206 is listed as Category III by the Alands in the Catholics; V elsewhere. Originally from "a Greek island" (Scrivener). Like 429, 522, 630, and 2200, it belongs with Family 2138 in the Catholics. According to Geer, it belongs with the pair 429 522, but only in the second half of Acts (in the first half of Acts it is a much weaker member of the family).
322XVLondonBritish Libr. Harley 5620Ib? Contains the Acts and Epistles. Sister of 323 or nearly. It has a weak Family 1739 text in Acts and the early Catholic Epistles; much more strongly Family 1739 in the later Catholics. Paul is mostly Byzantine. Classified by the Alands as Category II in the Catholics and III elsewhere. "There are no chapter divisions primâ manu; the writing is small and abbreviated" (Scrivener).
323XIIGeneva Public and University Library Gr. 20.Ib2 Contains the Acts and Epistles, with Acts 1:1-8, 2:36-45 from a later hand. Known to be a near-sister or forerunner of 322 since at least the time of Scrivener. It has a weak Family 1739 text in Acts and the early Catholic Epistles; much more strongly Family 1739 in the later Catholics. Paul is mostly Byzantine. Classified by the Alands as Category II in the Catholics and III elsewhere. "brought from Greece, beautifully but carelessly written, without subscriptions" (Scrivener).
429XIVWolfenbüttelHerzog August Libr. 16.7 Aug. Ao Ib1 Contains the Acts and Epistles in the hand of one George; the Apocalypse was added by a later (XV) hand. The Alands list it as Category III in the Acts and Catholics; V in Paul and the Apocalypse. Von Soden lists it as K(1) in the Apocalypse. According to Geer, it is closest to 522; also to 206 in the second half of Acts. Like 206, 522, 630, and 2200, it belongs with Family 2138 in the Catholics.
453XIVRomeVatican Libr. Barb. Gr. 582Ia1 Contains the Acts and Catholic Epistles (only), with commentary. Dated XI by Scrivener, but all other authorities give the date as XIV. Rated Category III by the Alands. Geer considers it a very weak member of Family 1739; certainly it is among the most Byzantine of the manuscripts listed here. Von Soden classified it as Ia1, and one of the manuscripts in that group is 307, found by the Alands to be very close to 453. (No one, however, has claimed 307 as a member of family 1739). In the Catholics, Wachtel lists it among the manuscripts that are 30-40% non-Byzantine, and groups it with 1678 and 2197.
5221515OxfordBodleian Library, Canon. Gr. 34Ib1 Complete New Testament, "written by Michael Damascenus the Cretin for John Francis Picus of Mirandola" (Scrivener). Rev. 2:11-23 are lost. The Alands list 522 as Category III in the Acts and Catholics; V in the Gospels, Paul, and Apocalypse. Von Soden lists it as Kx in the Gospels and Ib in the Apocalypse. It has the Euthalian prologues but evidently not the text. According to Geer, it is closest to 429; also to 206 in the second half of Acts. Like 206, 429, 630, and 2200, it belongs with Family 2138 in the Catholics.
630XIV RomeVatican Libr. Ottob. Gr. 325Ib Contains the Acts and Epistles (lacking Acts 4:9-5:1). Pairs with 2200 throughout and and probably with 1799 in the Catholics only; also (at a greater distance) with 206, 429, 522 in the Acts and Catholic Epistles (all of these manuscripts belonging to Family 2138 in the Catholics). The Alands list as Category III, but the text in fact varies widely. In Acts it is Family 1739 (with significant Byzantine mixture). The early epistles of Paul are also mixed Family 1739; in the later epistles it is entirely Byzantine. Geer indicates that 630 and 2200 are closer to 1891 than to 1739, and share with 1891 a tendency to turn Byzantine in the final chapters of Acts.
945XIAthos Dionysiu 124 (37)Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. In both the Acts and Catholic Epistles it stands very close to 1739, but with more Byzantine readings; it is possible that it is actually a corrupt descendent of 1739 itself, though perhaps more likely that it is derived from one of 1739's immediate ancestors (since it has a few non-Byzantine readings not found in 1739). In Acts, Geer reports that 945 is also close to 1739's near-sister 1891, and also to 1704. In the Gospels, von Soden lists it as belonging to Iφ (which he regarded as one of the weaker branches of Family 1424); Wisse corrects this to Kmix/Kx. The Alands list it as Category III in Acts and the Catholic Epistles, V in the Gospels and Paul. Even in Paul there are hints of 1739 type readings, but only very few; the main run of the text is Byzantine.
17041541AthosKutlumusiu 356 Contains the entire New Testament. Classified by the Alands as Category III in Acts, V elsewhere. Not profiled by Wisse because of its late date. According to Geer, it stands closest to 945, with 1739 next on the list. Based on Geer's data for "Primary Family 1739 readings," it would appear possible that 1704 is a descendent of 945, or at least of one of its near kin (nearer than 1739); in seventy readings, only once does 1704 have the family text when 945 does not, and there are several instances where 945 preserves the family reading but 1704 has been conformed to the Byzantine text. Geer confirms that 1704 is much more Byzantine in its final chapters.
1739XAthosLavra B' 64Ib2 Contains the Acts and Epistles, with marginal commentary. Acts 1:1-2:6 are from a later hand; they probably were added when the gospels were cut off. Written by the scribe Ephraem, who also wrote 1582. Best and often the earliest member of Family 1739, although the Alands rate it Category II in Acts (I elsewhere). Von Soden classifies it as H (Alexandrian) elsewhere. A near-sister of 1891, and possibly the ancestor of some of the other Family 1739 witnesses (e.g. 945 and 1704; probably not of the 206-429-522-630-2200 group). Furnished with a marginal commentary, mostly from Origen in Paul but from other sources in the Acts and Catholics.
1891XJerusalem; St. PetersburgJerus: Orthodox. Patr. Saba 107; St.P: Russ. National Libr. Gr. 317IbThe two leaves in St. Petersburg were formerly numbered 2162. Contains the Acts and Epistles. Text is valuable only in Acts (where the Alands rate it Category II; elsewhere V). Seems to be a near-sister of 1739, and very nearly as pure a text of the family. Geer reports a connection to 630, and also an increasing number of Byzantine readings in the final chapter. This suggests the possibility that its ancestor was a Byzantine manuscript corrected toward a good Family 1739 text, but only in Acts, with the corrector becoming careless as he approached the end of the manuscript.
2200XIVElassonOlympiotisses 79 IbContains the entire New Testament. Pairs with 630 in the Acts and Epistles; also with 1799 in the Catholics. Von Soden classifies it as Kx in the Gospels; Wisse lists it as Kx/Kmix/Kx. The Alands classify it as Category III in the Acts and Epistles, V in the Gospels and Apocalypse. Geer confirms its closeness to 630, and also with 1891, and indicated a shift toward the Byzantine text in the final chapters of Acts.

Family 1739 in Paul. The following manuscripts have been shown to beconnected with Family 1739 (or, in the case of 1908, with 1739 itself) in Paul:

MSDateLocationCatalog NumberSoden
descrip.
Comment
0121 XLondonBritish Libr. Harley 5613H Tischendorf's M, cited as 0121a in NA26; formerly lumped with the Hamburg portion of 0243 as M/0121 Contains 1 Cor. 15:52-16:24, 2 Cor. 1:1-15, 10:13-12:5. Written in red ink. Usually dated to century X, but Zuntz argues that its semi-uncial hand belongs to XII. Of the manuscripts of Family 1739, it is the one most likely to be descended from 1739 itself (see the list of readings cited above). The earlier portions (in 1 Corinthians and 2 Corinthians 1) are very close to 1739; the portion from the second half of 2 Corinthians has a heavy Byzantine overlay. Categorised by the Alands as Category III.
0243XHamburg, Vienna Vienna: National Libr. San Marco 983; Hamburg: Univ. Libr. Cod. 50 in scrin. HThe Hamburg portion was formerly known as 0121(b); Tischendorf's M. Contains 1 Cor. 13:4-2 Cor. 13:13 (Vienna); Hebrews 1:1-4:3, 12:20-13:25 (Hamburg). Written in red ink. Categorized by the Alands as Category II, but it is extremely close to 1739 (which is Category I); the two might possibly be sisters, although first or second cousins is more likely. Where it exists, 0243 is of equal authority with 1739 in determining the text of Family 1739.
6XIIIParisNational Libr. Gr. 112. HContains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles with lacunae. Von Soden classifies it as Ik in the Gospels; Wisse refines this to Π6. Elsewhere Von Soden classifies it as H (Alexandrian). The Alands specify it as Category III in Paul and the Catholics and V elsewhere. This assessment seems to be correct. 6 goes with Family 1739 in Paul and the Catholics (although it has a heavy mixture of Byzantine readings, often of the very latest sort); it appears Byzantine in Acts. Within Family 1739, it appears closest to 424**. The pair have a purer family text in Paul than in the Catholics. Wachtel places 6 in his 30-40% non-Byzantine group in the Catholics, without indicating any further classification. Scrivener reports that "This exquisite manuscript is written in characters so small that some pages require a glass to read them."
424**XIVienna Austrian National Libr. Theol. Gr. 302HContains the Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse (with some minor lacunae in the latter). The basic run of the text, 424*, is conceded by all to be purely Byzantine. The corrections (which are numerous only in Paul and the Catholic Epistles) are entirely different; in Paul they agree with 1739 some 90% of the time, and in the remaining instances we usually find 1739 to be Byzantine (with 424** often supported by other members of Family 1739). It would thus appear that 424 was corrected from a high-quality manuscript of the 1739 type. In both Paul and the Catholics it appears to be closest to 6; the pair are not quite so close to 1739 in the Catholics as in Paul.
630XIV RomeVatican Libr. Ottob. Gr. 325Ib Contains the Acts and Epistles (lacking Acts 4:9-5:1). Pairs with 2200 throughout and and probably with 1799 in the Catholics only; also (at a greater distance) with 206, 429, 522 in the Acts and Catholic Epistles (all of these manuscripts belonging to Family 2138 in the Catholics). The Alands list it as Category III, but the text in fact varies widely. In Acts it is Family 1739 (with significant Byzantine mixture). The early epistles of Paul are also mixed Family 1739; in the later epistles it is entirely Byzantine (the dividing line seems to fall roughly between Galatians and Ephesians, although the number of Byzantine readings increases steadily from Romans onward). In Acts, Geer indicates that 630 and 2200 are closer to 1891 than to 1739, and share with 1891 a tendency to turn Byzantine in the final chapters of Acts.
1739XAthosLavra B' 64H Contains the Acts and Epistles, with marginal commentary. Acts 1:1-2:6 are from a later hand; they probably were added when the gospels were cut off. Written by the scribe Ephraem, who also wrote 1582. Best and often the earliest member of Family 1739, although the Alands rate it Category II in Acts (I elsewhere). Von Soden classifies it as H in Paul and the Catholics; Ib2 in Acts. Along with 0243, the best and most important of the Family 1739 witnesses in Paul, but probably not the ancestor of any of the others except perhaps 0121. Furnished with a marginal commentary, mostly from Origen in Paul but from other sources elsewhere. A colophon states that the text of Romans was taken from Origen's commentary on that book, but the evidence of the other Family 1739 witnesses (which agree equally with 1739 in Romans and elsewhere) implies that there is no great shift in the text.
1881XIVSinaiSt. Catherine's Monastery Gr. 300 Contains Paul and portions of the Catholic Epistles (commencing in chapter 1 of 1 Peter; James and probably Acts have been lost). Classified as Category II by the Alands; Wachtel places it in the "over 40% [non-Byzantine]" category in the Catholic Epistles. Beyond this it has not been studied, but in Paul it is clearly the best complete Family 1739 text other than 1739 itself. Although it has suffered some Byzantine mixture, it appears to preserve some readings which have been replaced in 1739 by Byzantine readings.
1908XIOxfordBodl. Libr. Roe 16(H) Contains Paul with a marginal commentary -- according to von Soden, the commentary being that of (the pseudo-)Oecumenius. However, there are also certain comments in the margin which clearly derive from the commentary in 1739 (e.g. the omission of "in Rome" in Romans 1:7). Despite this, 1908 does not have a Family 1739 text; although it has some interesting readings (the Alands place it in Category III), these appear to be mostly Alexandrian.
2200XIVElassonOlympiotisses 79 IbContains the entire New Testament. Pairs with 630 in the Acts and Epistles; also with 1799 in the Catholics. Von Soden classifies it as Kx in the Gospels; Wisse lists it as Kx/Kmix/Kx. The Alands classify it as Category III in the Acts and Epistles, V in the Gospels and Apocalypse. Geer confirms its closeness in Acts to 630, and also with 1891, indicating a shift toward the Byzantine text in the final chapters of Acts. Its relationship to 630 has not been explored in detail in Paul, but it seems to endure. Thus we find assorted Family 1739 readings in the early epistles, but an almost purely Byzantine text roughly from Ephesians onward.

Family 1739 in the Catholics. The following list is derived from Amphoux andmy own researches, confirmed partly by Richards. Richards lists the members of Family1739 (his group A3) as P74 5 323 623 642 1241 1243 1739 1845.However, 642 and 1845 are members only in 2 and 3 John (which are too short to makeclassification a meaningful declaration), P74 is classified on too fewreadings to be meaningful, and even 5 and 623 are too far from the heart of the familyto be classified with certainty based on Richards' methods. These are therefore omittedfrom the list, as is 2492 (suggested by Amphoux). 2492 has some interesting readings(though it is more Byzantine than not), but there is no evident pattern of agreementwith 1739. 322 should probably be included in the list (as a sister of 323), but itsconnection with Family 1739 has not been verified.

MSDateLocationCatalog NumberSoden
descrip.
Comment
C/04VParis National Libr. Gr. 9HPalimpsest, originally containing the entire Greek Bible, but most of the Old Testament and nearly half the New have been lost. (In the Catholics, in addition to the first verse or two lost at the beginning of each book that was lost when the coloured ink they were written in washed off, it lacks James 4:2-end, 1 Pet. 4:5-end, 1 John 4:3-3 John 2.) Text-type varies (Alexandrian/Byzantine mix in the Gospels and Acts; purely Alexandrian in Paul and the Apocalypse). In the Catholics there is no trace of Byzantine influence. The text is not purely Family 1739, but neither is it Alexandrian; it falls between the two traditions, with the balance somewhat favouring Family 1739. Pending further investigation it is not clear if the text is an Alexandrian/Family 1739 mix or if it is some sort of "proto-Alexandrian" text (though Family 1739 is also associated with Origen, who of course predates C by centuries).
6XIIIParisNational Libr. Gr. 112. HContains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles with lacunae. Von Soden classifies it as Ik in the Gospels; Wisse refines this to Π6. Elsewhere Von Soden classifies it as H (Alexandrian). The Alands specify it as Category III in Paul and the Catholics and V elsewhere. This assessment seems to be correct. 6 goes with Family 1739 in Paul and the Catholics (although it has a heavy mixture of Byzantine readings, often of the very latest sort); it appears Byzantine in Acts. Within Family 1739, it appears closest to 424**. The pair have a purer family text in Paul than in the Catholics. Wachtel places 6 in his 30-40% non-Byzantine group in the Catholics, without indicating any further classification. Scrivener reports that "This exquisite manuscript is written in characters so small that some pages require a glass to read them."
323XIIGeneva Public and University Library Gr. 20.Ib2 Contains the Acts and Epistles, with Acts 1:1-8, 2:36-45 from a later hand. Known to be a near-sister or forerunner of 322 since at least the time of Scrivener. It has a weak Family 1739 text in Acts and the early Catholic Epistles; much more strongly Family 1739 in the later Catholics (roughly 2 Peter-Jude, but the increase in Family 1739 readings is gradual). Paul is mostly Byzantine. Classified by the Alands as Category II in the Catholics and III elsewhere. "brought from Greece, beautifully but carelessly written, without subscriptions" (Scrivener).
424**XIVienna Austrian National Libr. Theol. Gr. 302HContains the Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse (with some minor lacunae in the latter). The basic run of the text, 424*, is conceded by all to be purely Byzantine. The corrections (which are numerous only in Paul and the Catholic Epistles) are entirely different; in Paul they agree with 1739 some 90% of the time, and in the remaining instances we usually find 1739 to be Byzantine (with 424** often supported by other members of Family 1739). It would thus appear that 424 was corrected from a high-quality manuscript of the 1739 type. In both Paul and the Catholics it appears to be closest to 6; the pair are not quite so close to 1739 in the Catholics as in Paul.
945XIAthos Dionysiu 124 (37)Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. In both the Acts and Catholic Epistles it stands very close to 1739, but with more Byzantine readings; it is possible that it is actually a corrupt descendent of 1739 itself, though perhaps more likely that it is derived from one of 1739's immediate ancestors (since it has a few non-Byzantine readings not found in 1739). In Acts, Geer reports that 945 is also close to 1739's near-sister 1891, and also to 1704. In the Gospels, von Soden lists it as belonging to Iφ (which he regarded as one of the weaker branches of Family 1424); Wisse corrects this to Kmix/Kx. The Alands list it as Category III in Acts and the Catholic Epistles, V in the Gospels and Paul. Even in Paul there are hints of 1739 type readings, but only very few; the main run of the text is Byzantine.
1241XIISinai St. Catherine's Monastery Gr. 260HContains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles, with two lacunae (Matt. 8:14-13:3, Acts 17:10-18). In addition, about a quarter of Paul, and the whole of the Catholic Epistles, are later insertions. The text is thoroughly mixed (so, e.g., the Alands consider it Category III in the Gospels, V in Acts, III in Paul, and I in the Catholics). In Matthew and Mark it is mostly Byzantine with some Alexandrian readings; in Luke (where Wisse assigns it for the most part to Group B) the Alexandrian element comes to the fore; 1241 may be the most Alexandrian minuscule of that book. John is less Alexandrian than Luke but better than Matthew or Mark. In Acts, the text is purely Byzantine. This is also true of the text of Paul in the first hand; however, the supplements are generally of other sorts. In places they appear mixed Alexandrian, in others perhaps mixed family 1739. However, it is difficult to say with certainty given the number of Byzantine readings even in the supplements and their relatively limited extent. In the Catholics, 1241 is all from a later hand, but the quality of the supplement is very strong. Both Richards and Amphoux recognize it as a member of Family 1739, and Wachtel (who does not acknowledge the family) still places it in his best and least Byzantine category. Within Family 1739, 1241 ranks with 1739 itself and C as a witness, although it appears to belong with a slightly different branch of the family. Unlike manuscripts such as 945, it clearly is not a descendent of 1739, and provides an important check on the family text. Although 1241 is written in a fairly neat hand, it is generally regarded as carelessly written, with many scribal errors, misspellings, and nonsense readings.
1243XISinaiSt. Catherine's Monastery Gr. 262K Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. In the Gospels, it is classified Category III by the Alands; von Soden described it as Iβ. Wisse lists it as group 1216, paired with 1579. In Acts and Paul, the Alands again rate it Category III; von Soden demotes it to K for Acts -- which is reasonable for the Acts and Paul; non-Byzantine readings are few. It is not true in the Catholics, where the Alands raise 1243 to Category I, and Wachtel places it in the least Byzantine category. 1243 is clearly a member of Family 1739, falling closer to 1739 than to 1241, though perhaps with some influence from the C type of text.
1735XI/XIIAthosLavra B' 42K Contains the Acts and Epistles with lacunae. Von Soden classed it as a Byzantine witness, and this is true or nearly in the Acts and Paul. The Alands list it as Category III in those books, but promote it to Category II in the Catholics. Wachtel lists it in his least Byzantine category. Based on the evidence gathered by the Alands and Wachtel, it seems to be a rather weak Family 1739 witness.
1739XAthosLavra B' 64H Contains the Acts and Epistles, with marginal commentary. Acts 1:1-2:6 are from a later hand; they probably were added when the gospels were cut off. Written by the scribe Ephraem, who also wrote 1582. Best and often the earliest member of Family 1739, although the Alands rate it Category II in Acts (I elsewhere). Von Soden classifies it as H in Paul and the Catholics; Ib2 in Acts. Along with 0243, the best and most important of the Family 1739 witnesses in Paul, but probably not the ancestor of any of the others except perhaps 0121. Furnished with a marginal commentary, mostly from Origen in Paul but from other sources elsewhere. A colophon states that the text of Romans was taken from Origen's commentary on that book, but the evidence of the other Family 1739 witnesses (which agree equally with 1739 in Romans and elsewhere) implies that there is no great shift in the text. In the Catholics, 1739 might well be the ancestor of 945, and perhaps the pair 322/323 at a greater distance, but the leading witnesses (e.g. 1241, 1243, 1881) are clearly independent and probably go back to a slightly earlier form of the text.
1881XIVSinaiSt. Catherine's Monastery Gr. 300 Contains Paul and portions of the Catholic Epistles (commencing in chapter 1 of 1 Peter; James and probably Acts have been lost). Classified as Category II by the Alands; Wachtel places it in the "over 40% [non-Byzantine]" category in the Catholic Epistles. Beyond this it has not been studied, but in Paul it is clearly the best complete Family 1739 text other than 1739 itself. The situation is much the same in the Catholics: It is clearly a Family 1739 text with some Byzantine corruptions. It appears to stand slightly closer to 1241 than 1739, but generally stands between the two.
2298XIParisNational Libr. Gr. 102Ib2 Contains the Acts and Epistles complete. Despite its high Gregory number, this manuscript has long been known; it was 7a and 9p in the old catalogs, and seems to have been cited by Stephanus. Dated to century X by Scrivener and XII by Omond. A clear member of Family 1739 in the Catholics, and possibly a weak one in Acts. In Acts the Alands rate it Category III; they consider it Byzantine in Paul; in the Catholics they promote it to Category II, and Wachtel places it in his least Byzantine category. Still, it is not as strong a witness to the type as 1739 or 1241.


Manuscript 1799

Location/Catalog Number

Princeton, New Jersey (previously Baltimore, Maryland, and originallyfrom Mount Athos). Catalog number: Univ. Lib. Med. a. Ren. MS. Garrett8.

Contents

Acts and Epistles, lacking Acts 1:1-13:9, with assorted smaller lacunae(Jude 1-16, 2 Cor. 1:4-2:11, Phil. 4:13-Col. 1:21, 1 Thes. 1:1-2:5, 2 Thes.1:1-3:5). It is written on parchment, 1 column per page.

Date/Scribe

Dated XIII by Sprengling, who first examined it. K.W. Clark inclinesto XII. Kurzgefasste Liste dates it XII/XIII.

Description and Text-type

The only scholar who has classified this manuscript at all is Richards,who correctly assigns it to his "group A1" (family2138; see the entry on 2138)in the Johannine Epistles.

K.W. Clark, in the course of collating 1799, observed that (in Actsand the Catholics) it belongs with 2412 (i.e. family 2138), being particularlyclose to 206. This is clearly correct; 1799 is a member of family 2138, andapproaches the group 630-429-522-206. It is so close to 630that one is almost tempted to regard them as sisters.

In Paul the text is much weaker; it is largely Byzantine, and such fewnon-Byzantine readings as it has do not appear to belong with any particulargroup.

What is interesting about 1799, however, is not its text but the wayit has been edited. For 1799 is assuredly not a normal continuous-textmanuscript; it may even have been taken from a lectionary. There are nofewer than 217 modifications apparently designed for public reading. Tobe specific: There are in Paul 179 places where 1799 adds the wordαδελφοιto the text. In fifteen other places, the word has been moved from its normalplace in the text to the beginningof a sentence. (The word is dropped three times.) In the Pastoral Epistles,instead ofαδελφοιwe findτεκνονΤιμοθεεadded 21 times (and moved once) andτεκνοντιτεadded four times. It appears that all these exhortationsare intended to mark the beginnings of paragraphs; in every case they markthe beginnings of sentences. One can only suspect that these insertionswere made for purposes of public exhortation; they likely come from thelectionary. (Lection readings are noted in the margin.)

Aland and Aland neither collated nor classified 1799.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

von Soden: (reportedly ε610;obviously this is not correct!)

Bibliography

Collations:
K.W. Clark, Eight American Praxapostoloi (1941).

Sample Plates:

Editions which cite:

Other Works:


Manuscript 1881

Location/Catalog Number

Sinai, where it has been as long as it has been known. Catalog number:Katharinen-Kloster 300

Contents

Contains Paul complete. Also contains the Catholic Epistles of Peter,John, and Jude. It is written on paper, 1 column per page.

Date/Scribe

Dated paleographically to the fourteenth century.

Description and Text-type

1881 is a member of family 1739 in both Paul and the Catholics. In Paulit is the best complete manuscript of the family other than 1739 itself.It appears to retain at least a few family readings lost in 1739. The same appears to be truein the Catholics, although because of lack of text it is difficult to be certain.

Aland and Aland classify 1881 as Category II. This appearsto be correct based on their definition of the Categories; 1881 is a Family 1739 text withByzantine mixture.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

von Soden: α651

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:
Aland & Aland (1 page)

Editions which cite:
Cited in NA26 for Paul.
Cited in NA27 for Paul.
Cited all editions of UBS.

Other Works:


Manuscript 1906

Paris, National Library Coislin Gr. 28.Von Soden's Oπ101;Tischendorf/Scrivener 23p. Contains the Pauline Epistleswith a commentary (reported by Von Soden to be that of Oecumenius).The colophon dates it to the year 1056. As is typical of a commentarymanuscript, it has such reader aids as prologues, but lacks lectionaryequipment. It has a few interesting readings (as is typical ofcommentary manuscripts), but overall its text is fairly ordinary;the Alands list it as Category V, or Byzantine. This mightbe slightly unfair, but only slightly.