New Testament Manuscripts

Numbers 2001 and up

Note: In the catalog which follows, bold type indicates a fullentry. Plain type indicates a short entry, which may occur under anothermanuscript.

Contents:


Manuscript 2138 and Family 2138

Location/Catalog Number

Moscow. Catalog number: University 2.

Contents

2138 contains the Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse. It has a few slight lacunae(e.g. 1 John 2:7-17). 2138 is written on parchment, with one column per page.

Date/Scribe

Dated by its colophon to the year 1072.

Description and Text-type

Note: Family 2138 is the name that Amphoux offers for a large group of manuscriptshaving a very distinct text of the Acts and Catholic Epistles. The name is slightlydeceptive -- Family 2138 is actually a separate text-type (at least in the CatholicEpistles), not merely a family, and 2138 is not the earliest representative of thetype (the HarkleanSyriac is). Nor does 2138 always have the family text (in Paul, 2138 is mostlyByzantine). But I have adopted the name for consistency with Amphoux.

Now for the details on 2138:

Aland and Aland list 2138 as Category III in the Acts and Epistles andV in the Apocalypse. Von Soden describes it as Ic1 in the Acts and Epistlesand K in the Apocalypse. In the Johannine Epistles, Richards lists it as thebest representative of his A1 group (which Richards describes as havingan Alexandrian text, but in fact his A1 is Family 2138). Amphoux places it at thehead of Family 2138 in the Catholics. Wachtel puts it in the Hkgr family,another name for Family 2138.

The analysis of Amphoux, Richards, and Wachtel are clearly correct as far as theCatholic Epistles is concerned. 2138 is the oldest Greek witness,and one of the best representatives of the type, which bears its name. It shouldnot, however, be considered the ancestor of the type. Family 2138 is fairly large(Amphoux lists as primary witnesses 206, 429, 522, 614, 1108, 1292, 1448, 1505,1518, 1611, 1758, 1799, 1831, 1890, 2138, and 2495; Wachtel offers206, 429, 522, 614, 630, 1292, 1490, 1505, 1611, 1799, 1831, 1890, 2138, 2200, 2412,and 2495. Richards confirms the results for 206, 614, 1611, 1799, 2138, and 2412;I have verified them for 206, 429, 522, 614, 630, 1505, 1518, 1611, 1799, 2138,2412, and 2495). The Harklean Syriac also goes with this type. It can be shown thatthe family falls into various subgroups (2138+1611, 614+2412, 630+1799+2200,1505+2495). Since the other groups preserve certain family readings not found in2138 and 1611, it follows that the group is earlier (and less Byzantine) than2138. It is, in fact, older than the Harklean Syriac, since the Harklean alsolacks many characteristic readings of the family. It thus appears that Family 2138is an early text-type. Amphoux equates it with the "Western" text, butthis is rather doubtful based on the results in Paul.

It appears that Family 2138 also exists in the Acts, and includes many of thesame witnesses as in the Catholics. In Acts, however, the family is somewhat lessstriking. Its best-known representative, 614, has often been labelled"Western" -- but here, again, the evidence is somewhat weak.(See also the entry on 614.)

A distinct group of Family 2138 witnesses also exists in Paul, but herethe name is deceptive,since 2138 -- which in these books is largely Byzantine -- appears to abandon it.The remaining texts are 1505, 1611, 2495, probably 2005, and a portionof 1022 (Pastorals, Hebrews), plus of course the Harklean Syriac. Thefamily is much more Byzantine than in the Acts and Epistles. It is worthnoting that this family does not show any demonstrable affiliation withthe D-F-G text. Thus there is no direct evidence that Family 2138 is"Western" in any part of the New Testament.

The following offers a brief summary of information about the various membersof Family 2138 in Paul. Note: Von Soden also classifies 1518, 1108, 2138,and 1245 with the Ic1 group -- but 1518 is lost, 1108 and 1245 seem to be mixed,and 2138 has at best a weak family text in Paul; they are therefore omitted from thetable pending better information.

MSDateLocationCatalog NumberSoden
descrip.
Comment
1022XIVBaltimoreWalters Art Gallery MS. 533Kx Contains the Acts and Epistles with minor lacunae. Contains a Family 2138 text only in the Pastorals and Hebrews; elsewhere it is Byzantine (the Alands do not classify 1022, but Richards places it in his group B4 in the Catholics). A collation was published by K. W. Clark.
1505XIIAthos Lavra B' 26(Kx)Colophon claims a date of 1084, but Colwell has shown this is false. Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. The Alands list it as Category III in the Acts and Epistles, V in the Gospels. Wisse confirms that it is Byzantine in the Gospels (Kx and Kx Cluster 281; paired with 2495, which pairs with 1505 in the Acts and Epistles as well).
1611X (earlier dated XII)AthensNational Library 94Ic1 Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse with lacunae. Earliest and best Greek manuscript of the family in Paul. Rated Category III by the Alands (but II in the Apocalypse, where von Soden groups it with Andreas!).
2005XIVEscorialPsi III 2Ic1 Contains the Acts and portions of Paul (2 Corinthians-Hebrews). Rated Category III for Paul by the Alands. Not properly studied, and may not be a member of Family 2138, but scattered readings in von Soden imply that it probably goes with this text at least in part.
2495XIV/XVSinai St. Catherine's Monastery Gr. 1992 Contains the entire New Testament with minor lacunae. Very close to 1505 but slightly more Byzantine; it may possibly be a descendent of 1505. Wisse reports that it also goes with 1505 in the Gospels (Kx and Kx Cluster 281; paired with 1505). The Alands rate it "Category III with reservations" in Paul.

The following offers a brief summary of information about the various membersof Family 2138 in the Catholics. The column "Identified by" liststhe scholar(s) who have associated the manuscript with Family 2138.

MSDateLocationCatalog NumberSoden
descrip.
Identified byComment
206XIIILondonLambeth 1182Ib1 Amphoux, Richards, WachtelContains the Acts and Epistles with lacunae. 2 and 3 John and Jude are not Family 2138; they come from another hand (dated XIV) which also supplied Acts 1:1-12:3, 13:5-15. 206 is listed as Category III by the Alands in the Catholics; V elsewhere. Originally from "a Greek island" (Scrivener). Like 429, 522, 630, and 2200, it belongs to Family 1739 in Acts.
429XIVWolfenbüttelHerzog August Libr. 16.7 Aug. Ao Ib1 Amphoux, WachtelContains the Acts and Epistes in the hand of one George; the Apocalypse was added by a later (XV) hand. The Alands list it as Category III in the Acts and Catholics; V in Paul and the Apocalypse. Von Soden lists it as K(1) in the Apocalypse. Like 206, 522, 630, and 2200, it belongs to Family 1739 in Acts.
5221515OxfordBodleian Library, Canon. Gr. 34Ib1 Amphoux, WachtelComplete New Testament, "written by Michael Damascenus the Cretin for John Francis Picus of Mirandola" (Scrivener). Rev. 2:11-23 are lost. The Alands list 522 as Category III in the Acts and Catholics; V in the Gospels, Paul, and Apocalypse. Von Soden lists it as Kx in the Gospels and Ib in the Apocalypse. It has the Euthalian prologues but evidently not the text. Like 206, 429, 630, and 2200, it belongs to Family 1739 in Acts.
614 XIIIMilanAmbrosian Libr. E 97 SupIc2 Amphoux, Richards, WachtelContains the Acts and Epistles (missing Jude 3-end). Pairs with 2412 (the Alands, who rate 614 as Category III, consider them sisters; Clark thought 2412 might be 614's exemplar; it is perhaps most likely that 614 is a niece or grand-niece of 2412). Commonly linked to the "Western" text in Acts -- although this cannot be considered conclusively proved.
630XIV RomeVatican Libr. Ottob. Gr. 325IbWachtel Contains the Acts and Epistles (lacking Acts 4:9-5:1). Pairs with 2200 throughout and probably with 1799 (in the Catholics only); also (at a greater distance) with 206, 429, 522. The Alands list as Category III, but the text in fact varies widely. In Acts it, like 206, 429, 522, and 2200, belongs to Family 1739 (with significant Byzantine mixture). The early epistles of Paul are also mixed Family 1739; in the later epistles it is entirely Byzantine. In the Catholics it is one of the best Family 2138 groups.
1108XIIIAthosEsphigmenu 64Ic1Amphoux Contains the Acts and Epistles with lacunae. Identified by Von Soden as Family 2138 in Paul as in the Catholics, but evidence for this is weak. Not classified by the Alands, which probably indicates that it has, at best, a weak family text.
1292XIIIParisNational Libr. Suppl. Gr. 1224Amphoux, Wachtel Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. The Alands list 1292 as Category II in the Catholics and V elsewhere. Listed by the von Soden as Ik in the Gospels and Kx in Paul. Wisse describes it as weak Πb in Luke 1 and Kx in Luke 20.
1448XIAthosLavra A' 13Amphoux Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. The Alands list 1448 as Category III in the Catholics and V elsewhere. Listed by Von Soden as Kx (?) in the Gospels; Wisse describes it as Cluster 127. Wachtel does not consider it to be a true member of Family 2138, but lists it (along with 1852) as being in the "Umfeld" of the family, implying that it is somewhat akin.
1490XIIAthosLavra A' 65KrWachtel Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. Not classified by the Alands or Wisse.
1505XIIAthos Lavra B' 26(Kx)Amphoux, WachtelColophon claims a date of 1084, but Colwell has shown this is false. Contains the Gospels, Acts, and Epistles. Pairs with 2495. The Alands list it as Category III in the Acts and Epistles, V in the Gospels. Wisse confirms that it is Byzantine in the Gospels (Kx and Kx Cluster 281; paired with 2495).
1518XIVIc1Amphoux Lost (formerly at Lambeth Palace in London; may be the same as 1896). Contained the Acts and Epistles (missing Acts 7:52-8:25).
1611X (earlier dated XII)AthensNational Library 94Ic1 Amphoux, Richards, Wachtel Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse with lacunae. Pairs with 2138, although it seems to be later and inferior. Rated Category III by the Alands (but II in the Apocalypse, where von Soden groups it with Andreas!).
1758XIIILesbosLimonos 132.Ib1Amphoux Contains the Acts, Epistles, and Apocalyse with lacunae. Not classified by the Alands.
1799XII/XIII Princeton (N.J.)Univ. Libr. Med. a. Ren. Ms. Garrett 8 Amphoux, Richards, WachtelActs and Epistles with lacunae. Seems to go with 630 and 2200 in the Catholics. In Paul it has a mostly Byzantine text, with a very few readings of other sorts, plus lectionary incipits. Not classfied by the Alands; von Soden lists it as a gospels manuscript!
1831XIVAthensNational Libr. 131Ib1 Amphoux, WachtelContains the Acts and Epistles with lacunae. Not classified by the Alands.
1890XIVJerusalemTaphu 462Amphoux Contains the Acts and Epistles. Not classified by the Alands. Wachtel notes that it belongs to Hkgr (family 2138) in James and 1 Peter, but is largely Byzantine in the other epistles.
21381072MoscowUniv. 2IcaAmphoux, Richards, Wachtel Contains the Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypse. Von Soden classified the Apocalypse as K. The Alands list it as Category III in the Acts and Epistles and V in the Apocalypse. 2138 pairs with 1611 (though 2138 is the better of the two). It is the best and (except for the Harklean Syriac) earliest manuscript of Family 2138, but is not the ancestor of the others; the 2138+1611 group has some Byzantine corruptions not found in the 614+2412, 630+1799+2200, and 1505+2495 groups.
2200XIVElassonOlympiotisses 79 IbWachtelContains the entire New Testament. Pairs with 630 in the Acts and Epistles; also with 1799 in the Catholics. Von Soden classifies it as Kx in the Gospels; Wisse lists it as Kx/Kmix/Kx. Geer classifies it (like 630, and also 206, 429, and 522) with Family 1739 in Acts. The Alands classify it as Category III in the Acts and Epistles, V in the Gospels and Apocalypse.
2412XIIChicagoUniversity of Chicago Libr. MS. 922 Richards, WachtelContains the Acts and Epistles, missing Rom. 13:4-15:26, Hebrews 13:7-16. Heb. 12:28-13:6 was written by a later hand over an erasure. Pairs with 614 (the Alands list them as sisters, both belonging to Category III; Clark offers the possibility that 2412 is the exemplar of 614). K. W. Clark, who published a collation, describes it as "neat and plain, and fairly well preserved."
2495XIV/XVSinai St. Catherine's Monastery Gr. 1992Amphoux, Wachtel Contains the entire New Testament with minor lacunae. Very close to 1505 but slightly more Byzantine; it may possibly be a descendent of 1505. Wisse reports that it also goes with 1505 in the Gospels (Kx and Kx Cluster 281; paired with 1505). The Alands rate it "Category III with reservations" in Paul and "higher" for the Catholics.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript
von Soden: α116

Bibliography

Collations:
Barbara Aland with Andreas Juckel, Das Neue Testament in SyrischerÜberliefung I collates 2138 (along with 1505, 1611, and 2495)against the Harklean Syriac in James, 1 Peter, and 1 John.

Sample Plates:

Editions which cite:
Cited in UBS4 for the Catholic Epistles.
Cited by Von Soden, Merk, and Bover for the Acts and Epistles, butthe citations are not overly accurate.

Other Works:
C.-B. Amphoux, "La Parenté textuelle de syh etdu gr. 2138 dans Jacques," Biblica 62.
C.-B. Amphoux, "Quelques témoins grecs des formes textuellesles plus anciennes de l'Epître de Jacques: le groupe 2138 (ou 614)"New Testament Studies 28.


Manuscript 2145

Saint Petersburg, Russian National Library Greek 222. Soden'sε1222.Contains the Gospels; Matthew 1:1-9:28 being lost.Dated by its colophon to 1144/1145, and written by a scribe named John.Textually the manuscriptcontains several interesting features; the first hand lacksthe story of the Adulteress, which was added by a later hand. Inaddition, the title page of Mark contains a sort of summary ofMark 16:9-20. Von Soden classified 2145 as Io(other manuscripts of this type beingU X 213 443 1071 1321(part) 1574). Wisse describes it as M1195in Luke 1 and 10 and Kx in Luke 20. Other members of M1195include 293 1195 1589 2200(part) 2549(part). The Alands do notassign 2145 to a Category; this seemsto imply that 2145 is not purely Byzantine, but is much moreByzantine than anything else.


Manuscript 2200

Location/Catalog Number

Elasson. Catalog number: Olympiotisses, 79.

Contents

Contains the entire New Testament. 2200 is written on paper, one column per page.

Date/Scribe

Dated paleographically to the fourteenth century.

Description and Text-type

In the Gospels, von Soden grouped 2200 with Kx. This concurswith Aland and Aland (who place it in Category V) and for the most part withWisse, who places it in Kx in Luke 10 and 20, although he classifiesit as M1195 in Luke 1.

In the Apocalypse, the Alands place it in Category V. It belongs to themain K group (headed by 046).

2200 is much more interesting in the Acts and Epistles, where the Alandspromote it to Category III and von Soden places it in Ib. We can,however, be more detailed. Wachtel places it in the Hkgr (family2138) group in the Catholic Epistles. Geer places itamong the members of Family 1739 in the Acts. Within family 1739, 2200 isclosest to 630 (a fact confirmedby both the Alands and Geer).

This kinship continues in Paul. The apparatus of UBS4 lists396 readings for 2200. 630 exists for 392 of these. And the two manuscriptsagree in 378 of these 392 readings (96%; by comparison, 2200 agrees with L --a typical Byzantine manuscript -- 80% of the time, and with 1739 61% of the time).Even more amazingly, 630 and 2200 agree in all 54 of their mutual non-Byzantinereadings. The following table lists their disagreements, with comments:

Verse2200 reads630 readsComment
Rom. 5:1 εχομεν εχωμεν
Rom. 10:1 του Ισραελ εστιν αυτων 2200 Byzantine; 630 with 1739
Rom. 14:19 2200*vid διωκομεν διωκωμεν 630 2200** Byzantine
Rom. 15:24 Σπανιαν Σπανιαν ελευσομαι προς υμας 630 Byzantine; 2200 with 1739
1Co 4:17 Χριστω Χριστω Ιησου 2200 Byzantine; 630 with 1739
1Co 11:15 δεδοται αυτη δεδοται 2200 Byzantine; 630 with 1739
1Co 13:3 καυθησωμαι καυθησομαι
1Co 15:49 φορεσωμεν φορεσομεν 2200 Byzantine (with 1739); 630 with 6 1881
1Co 15:54 οταν δε το θνητον... αθανασιαν οταν δε το φθαρτον... αθανασιαν 630 Byzantine; 2200 with 1739*
1Co 15:55 νικος που σου αδη το νικος κεντρον που σου αδη το νικος 630 Byzantine; 2200 subsingular
2Co 1:10 οτι και ετι οτι και 2200 Byzantine
2Co 1:11 ημων υμων 2200 Byzantine
2Co 12:1 καυχασθαι δη καυχασθαι δει
Gal 4:7 θεου δια Χριστου δια Χριστου 2200 Byzantine; 630 subsingular

Thus it will be seen that 2200 and 630 are extremely close in both Acts and Epistles.(It is interesting that they are also of the same century.) Based on the above, it wouldappear that neither is the ancestor of the other. The two are probably cousins, descendedfrom the same ancestor with one or two intermediate stages. This means that 2200's textis closely comparable to 630's: Weak Family 1739 in the Acts; weak family 1739 inRomans-Galatians; purely Byzantine in Ephesians-Hebrews; Family 2138 in the CatholicEpistles.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript
von Soden: δ414

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:

Editions which cite:
Cited in UBS4 for Paul.

Other Works:
Thomas C. Geer, Jr., Family 1739 in Acts (Society of BiblicalLiterature Monograph Series, 1994). Consists mostly of tables comparingmanuscripts 206, 322, 323, 429, 453, 522, 630, 945, 1704, 1739, 1891, 2200.The analysis is flawed, but the results are generally valid.


Manuscript 2427

Location/Catalog Number

Chicago. Catalog number: University of Chicago Library, MS. 972.

Contents

2427 contains the Gospel of Mark (only).

Date/Scribe

2427 is written on parchment, one column per page. Paleographers lookingat the writing have dated the manuscript to the fourteenth century (but seebelow).

Description and Text-type

Because 2427 came to light relatively recently, and because it containsonly Mark, few attempts have been made to classify it. The only comprehensiveclassification to include it is that of the Alands, who rate itCategory I.

Despite the limitations of the Alands' methods, this seems to be formally acorrect evaluation. 2427 is unquestionably the least Byzantine and moststrongly Alexandrian of the minuscules of Mark. It is, in fact, the strongestally of Vaticanus in that book; it seems to stand in almost the same relationshipwith B as B has with P75 -- i.e. the same sort of text, with a slightmixture of other readings which have arisen over time. Samples indicate aboutan 80% rate of agreement with B; the only substantial difference is that2427 includes 16:9-20. 2427 is not nearly as close to the otherAlexandrian witnesses.

The above circumstances have left 2427 under something of a cloud. It iscertainly reasonable to ask how a fourteenth century minuscule could havefewer Byzantine readings than any other manuscript more recent than thefourth century! So there were many who have doubted its authenticity. Thisled to further examinations, of various types. Mary Virginia Orna, Patricia L. Lang,J. E. Katon, Thomas F. Mathews, and Robert S. Nelson, in "Applicationsof Infrared Microspectroscopy to Art Historical Questions about MedievalManuscripts" (Archaeological Chemistry, 4 (1988), pp. 270-288)find that one of the illustrations contain a chemical with a cyanide (-CN) group.The earliest known pigment containing a cyanide group is Prussian Blue(KFe[Fe(CN)6]) -- first commercially produced by Diebach inaround 1704. The chemical is complex, and rather dangerous to create, sochances are strong (though it's not quite certain) that a painting containingit dates from the eighteenth century or later. (Thanks to Wieland Willker forbringing this to my attention.)

On the other hand, the parchment appears old (though it has not, to myknowledge, been examined in detail with modern methods), andthe writing is also somewhat weathered. It's hard to know what to make ofthis. If genuine, 2427 should be considered among theleading Alexandrian witnesses. If a forgery (and the evidence does perhapspoint in that direction), what was the purpose? Is it possible that theillustrations are later than the manuscript itself? Or could they havebeen retouched?

And chemical arguments have certain dangers. For example, it has beenmaintained that the presence of titanium dioxide in ink implies recentcreation. But it has now been shown that titanium dioxide doesoccur in older inks.

It appears that the answer has finally been found. Stephen C. Carlsoninforms me (private communication) that 2427appears to have been copied from the New Testament edition of Philipp Buttmann,published 1860. This in turn was largely based on Cardinal Mai's edition ofVaticanus. It is widely and correctly stated that Mai's edition of B is verybad -- but it is genuinely an edition of B, just an error-filled one. This,note, explains both the similarity of 2427 to B and its significant divergences.

Carlson's results were published in 2006, and since then, Dr. Willker hasundertaken to verify these results. He concurs with Carlson. It would appear thatthe mystery of 2427 has been solved. And that it should be removed from thecritical apparatus.

That of course leaves the task of figuring out the history of the manuscriptsince the forgery was created.But if the manuscript was made in the nineteenth century -- perhaps, if we wishto be generous, by someone who wanted a manuscript with a very old text -- thiscould also explain the manuscript's weathered look.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:
Aland & Aland (1 page)

Editions which cite:
Cited in NA27.
Cited in UBS4.
Cited in SQE13.

Other Works:

See Dr. Willker's web site for his detailed analysis. Carlson's work waspublished by SBL.


Manuscript 2464

Location/Catalog Number

Patmos. Catalog number: Joannu 742.

Contents

Originally contained the Acts and Epistles. The largest part of Actshas been lost; the manuscript begins in chapter 19. In Paul, 2464 lacksRom. 11:29-16:10, the Pastorals, Philemon,and Hebrews 7:2-14, 9:20-10:4,10:19-end. In the Catholics, the manuscript ends in 3 John; Jude has beenlost. 2464 is written on parchment, with one column per page in the Gospelsand two columns per page elsewhere.

Date/Scribe

Originally dated to the tenth century, NA27 lowers this tothe ninth century (probably based on the claim by F. J. Leroy that 2464is from the same pen -- that of Nikolaos Studites -- as the dated ninthcentury minuscule 461. Aland and Wachtel do not concede this claim, butallow that "2464... comes from the same time and probably even thesame scriptorium as the Uspenski Gospels [=461]").

Description and Text-type

The basic run of the text is late Alexandrian, but heavily mixed. Romansis almost purely Byzantine. Even in the remaining books it appears thatabout half the original Alexandrian readings have been replaced by Byzantine.2464 has few striking readings; its readings are usually supported by alarge number of Alexandrian witnesses.

Aland and Aland list 2464 as Category II. It is the author's opinionthat this is clearly too high a ranking. Even if one ignores the blockmixture in Romans, the rest of the text has enough Byzantine readings thatit belongs in Category III.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:

Editions which cite:
Cited in NA26 for Paul.
Cited in NA27 for Paul.
Cited in UBS4 for the Acts and Epistles.

Other Works:
F. J. Leroy, "Le Patmos St. Jean 742 [Gregory 2464]," published inTh. Lefèvre, Zetesis, Bijdragen... aan Prof. Dr. E. de Stijcker, 1973.
Barbara Aland and Klaus Wachtel, "The Greek Minuscule Manuscriptsof the New Testament" (translated by Bart D. Ehrman, and appearing inEhrman & Michael W. Holmes, Eds., The Text of the New Testament inContemporary Research: Essays on the Status Quaestionis, Eerdmans, 1995)very briefly discusses, with references, the history of 2464 (p. 45).


Manuscript 2495

Location/Catalog Number

Sinai. Catalog number: Kathar.-Kloster Gr. 1992.

Contents

Originally contained the entire New Testament. A few odd phrases havebeen lost due to damage over the years. It is written on paper, one columnper page.

Date/Scribe

Dated paleographically to the fourtheenth/fifteenth century.

Description and Text-type

In the Acts and Epistles, 2495 belongs with the family 2138text-type(also called family 1611, family 614, Hkgr, etc.; a Greek textrelated to that also found in the Harklean Syriac; see the entry on2138). It is particularlyclose to 1505;if 2495 is not a descendent of 1505, they certainly havea close common ancestor. 2495, however, has noticeably more Byzantine readingsthan 1505. It preserves few if any family readings not found in 1505.

In the Catholics, 1505 and 2495 form a distinctive subtype within family2138 (other subgroups being 2138+1611, 614+2412, 630+1799+2200, etc). Some,e.g. Amphoux, have considered this to be residue of the "Western"text. This, however, can be disputed; see the entry on 614.

In Paul, the text of this family is much weaker, and clear representativesare fewer (to my knowledge, only 1505, 1611, 2495, the Harklean Syriac,probably 2005, and parts of 1022).

1505 and 2495 also go together in the Gospels, although there they areByzantine.

To date, 2495 has not been studied in the Apocalypse. (1505 does notcontain that book.)

See also the entry on 1505.

Wisse describes 2495 as Kmix/Kx/Kx,and adds "Kx Cluster 261 in 1 and 10; pair with 1505."Aland and Aland list it as "Category III with reservations, but higherin the Catholic Epistles."

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:

Editions which cite:
Cited in NA26 for the Acts and Epistles.In NA27 it has been quite reasonablybeen replaced by 1505,which has an earlier and bettertext of the same type.
Cited in UBS3 for the Acts and Epistles.

Other Works:


Manuscript 2542

Location/Catalog Number

Saint Petersburg. Catalog number: Public Library Gr. 694

Contents

2542 contains Matthew with slight lacunae, Mark, and Luke (missing 24:20-end).

Date/Scribe

Dated paleographically to the twelfth (so SQE13) or thirteenthcentury (so NA27, Wisse, etc.). 2542 is written on parchment, one columnper page.

Description and Text-type

2542 has only recently come to scholarly attention, and relativelylittle is known of its text. The Alands classify it asCategory III.Wisse lists it as Mixed in Luke 1 and a weak member of Family 1 inLuke 10 and 20.

Both assessments seem to be correct. Spot checks of the Nestle apparatusshow 2542 to be much more Byzantine than anything else. In some places (e.g Mark 8) itdoes appear to have affinities with family 1 (although even here it ismore Byzantine than most members of the family); in others (e.g. Mark 1)it seems to be simply a witness with many Byzantine readings and a handful ofnon-Byzantine variants of no particular type.

Since 2542 lacks the Gospel of John, we cannot tell where it placesJohn 7:53-8:11 (which Family 1, of course, places after John 21:25). Otherthan that, it generally has the more Byzantine reading at noteworthy pointsof variation (e.g. it includes Mark 16:9-20 without variant or question;although Family 1 has a note here; 2542 also includes Luke 22:43-44, 23:34,although of course both of these are found in Family 1).

Quite frankly, I do not understand 2542 was included in the NA27 apparatuswhen manuscripts such as 157, 1071, and 1241 were omitted. It is a useful but notexceptional manuscript.

Other Symbols Used for this Manuscript

Bibliography

Collations:

Sample Plates:

Editions which cite:
Cited in NA27 for Mark and Luke.
Cited in SQE13 (with no notation in the list of witnesses of anylacunae, indicating that it is cited for all four gospels. Obviously, however,it cannot be cited for John, and a cursory examination of the apparatus toMatthew makes me wonder if it is fully cited for that gospel).

Other Works: